temple of nothing that lingers
architecture
temple of nothing that lingers
icancauseaconstellation:

javiersanchezfoto:
Plaza Belluga desde el Ayuntamiento de Murcia
Arquitecto, Rafael Moneo
antonas:

Fragmens from the “Warehouse Man” from Quaderns, by Aristide Antonas.
smallspacesblog:

Ray Kappe-Designed Multilevel House in Los Angeles
smallspacesblog:

Ray Kappe-Designed Multilevel House in Los Angeles
plansofarchitecture:

Jørn Utzon, 1964
onsomething:

Pouya Khazaeli Parsa | Villa in Darvishabad, 2010.
Photo Mohsen Jazayeri
ZoomInfo
urbangeographies:

GOLDEN GATE PARK:  San Francisco’s spectacular park covers 1,017 acres (412 ha) — 20 percent larger than Central Park in New York. With 13 million visitors annually, Golden Gate is one of the country’s most-visited city urban parks. 
Named after the nearby Golden Gate strait, the park resulted from the work of field engineer William Hammond Hall, who prepared a survey and topographic map of the site in 1870 and became its commissioner in 1871. Hall and his assistant, John McLaren, who later became the park commissioner in 1887, developed the plan and plantings.
The first stage of the park’s development centered on planting trees in order to stabilize the sand dunes that covered three-quarters of the park’s area. Then, plantings of Eucalyptus globulus, Monterey pine, and Monterey cypress and other species covered the land. The park quickly became a major attractive for residents and visitors alike! 
Sources:  Wikipedia and the San Francisco Recreation & Parks Dept.
urbangeographies:

GOLDEN GATE PARK:  San Francisco’s spectacular park covers 1,017 acres (412 ha) — 20 percent larger than Central Park in New York. With 13 million visitors annually, Golden Gate is one of the country’s most-visited city urban parks. 
Named after the nearby Golden Gate strait, the park resulted from the work of field engineer William Hammond Hall, who prepared a survey and topographic map of the site in 1870 and became its commissioner in 1871. Hall and his assistant, John McLaren, who later became the park commissioner in 1887, developed the plan and plantings.
The first stage of the park’s development centered on planting trees in order to stabilize the sand dunes that covered three-quarters of the park’s area. Then, plantings of Eucalyptus globulus, Monterey pine, and Monterey cypress and other species covered the land. The park quickly became a major attractive for residents and visitors alike! 
Sources:  Wikipedia and the San Francisco Recreation & Parks Dept.
the-gasoline-station:

"Wall, what is it good for? Absolutely nothin’!"
by uglybelgianhouses